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Environment 2017-03-28T14:25:06+00:00

Natural gas is recognized as today’s cleanest commercial fossil fuel for power generation. The Renaissance Energy Center (REC) will use the most advanced emission control technology to meet or exceed all local, state and federal environmental standards.

The Project is designed as a combined-cycle facility, which produces electricity in a highly efficient manner. Combined-cycle facilities produce electricity through the combustion of natural gas in a gas turbine. The hot exhaust gas from the gas turbine is used to heat water into steam in a heat recovery steam generator. The steam is then used to drive a steam turbine which produces more electricity without the use of any additional fuel. Combined-cycle facilities are approximately 80% more efficient than coal power plants.

Using natural gas produces the lowest emission rates of all fossil fuels. The chart below compares actual average emission rates of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOX) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a pounds/megawatt-hour basis. The comparison is based on information from M. J. Bradley & Associates (2016) – Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States.

Benchmarking Air Emissions Rankings

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The graph to the right compares actual average emission rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) from all fossil-fueled generating stations in the U.S. and in Pennsylvania to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a pounds/megawatt-hour basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from U.S. Plants Data: Environmental Protection Agency, eGRID2014 (2014 data).

US and PA Combustion CO2 Emission Averages vs REC

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The graph below compares actual average emission rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) from all fossil-fueled generating stations in the U.S. and in Pennsylvania to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a pounds/megawatt-hour basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from U.S. Plants Data: Environmental Protection Agency, eGRID2014 (2014 data).

US and PA Combustion CO2 Emission Averages vs REC

Click graph to enlarge

US and PA Combustion Emission Averages vs. REC

Click graph to enlarge

The graph to the left compares actual average emission rates of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) from all fossil-fueled generating stations in the U.S. and in Pennsylvania to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a pounds/megawatt-hour basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from U.S. Plants Data: Environmental Protection Agency, eGRID2014 (2014 data).

US and PA Combustion Emission Averages vs. REC

Click graph to enlarge

The graph above compares actual average emission rates of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) from all fossil-fueled generating stations in the U.S. and in Pennsylvania to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a pounds/megawatt-hour basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from U.S. Plants Data: Environmental Protection Agency, eGRID2014 (2014 data).

The graph to the right compares actual average emission rates of sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM), carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) from the former Hatfield’s Ferry power plant to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a tons per year basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Comparison of Power Plant and REC Emission Rates

Click graph to enlarge

The graph below compares actual average emission rates of sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM), carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) from the former Hatfield’s Ferry power plant to the estimated maximum emission rates from the Project on a tons per year basis. The comparison is based on information obtained from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.

Comparison of Power Plant and REC Emission Rates

Click graph to enlarge